R.I.P Margot Kidder

I’ve just heard that Margot Kidder has died, aged 69, and immediately my mind turned to Saturday matinees at the local cinema in the late seventies/early eighties. The cinema is long gone but the memories remain.

And of you, too, Lois Lane.

R.I.P

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Thought For The Day

North and South Korea getting together for coffee and now Abba bringing out new material. I think I’ve slipped into a parallel world. Probably some time during the school holidays.

For Oscar Night, The Morning After

As it was Oscar night last night, I thought I’d post these photographs of my favourite actress’ two Oscar wins: Vivien Leigh in 1940 for Gone With The Wind and in 1952 for A Streetcar Named Desire.

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I was going to stay up and watch the awards live (last night’s I mean, not Vivien’s, as it’s kinda hard if you’re not yet born), but the flesh was weak and I recorded it instead to watch later.

But as always it’s difficult to avoid spoilers. I was pleased that Gary Oldman won Best Actor for Darkest Hour and Frances McDormand won Best Actress for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. I saw both of these films and predicted both stars for the honours after enjoying both movies. I got Best Film wrong though, tipping Three Billboards which was my favourite. But two out of three ain’t bad.

R.I.P Dolores O’Riordan

I was saddened tonight to hear of the sudden death of Dolores O’Riordan. I used to like The Cranberries back in the 90’s, and the fact that she was the same age as I really hit home.

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From Limerick, I loved that Irish accent of hers, haunting and evocative among the rolling guitar and drums.

From Wikipedia:

Their music has been likened to singers such as Sinéad O’Connor and Siouxsie and the Banshees. O’Riordan stated her singing style incorporating yodeling was inspired by her father who used to sing “The Lonesome Cattle Call”: “I just kept with my father all the time, just copying him and eventually I learned how to do it. Then over the years there were artists like Sinéad O’Connor and Siouxsie from Siouxsie and the Banshees and even Peter Harvey was doing it. It was something that you could work into The Cranberries’ format because a lot of that was used in religious Irish music.”

The first song that brought them to my attention was the gorgeous ballad Linger with its dreamy vocal and strings, written about the singer’s first serious kiss. Almost twenty five years on this is still a favourite of mine.

The video to accompany Linger was shot in grayscale and is a tribute to  Jean-Luc Godard’s 1965 noir film Alphaville.

Another  favourite Cranberries track is the protest song Zombie, written in the wake of the Warrington bombing that claimed the lives of two children. O’Riordan is strikingly painted gold in the video, standing at the foot of a cross. Patrolling soldiers and children playing in Northern Ireland also feature.

Beginning

Another head hangs lowly
Child is slowly taken
And the violence caused such silence
Who are we mistaken

the first time I encountered it I heard the ‘1916’ reference and thought it was about a traumatised ex-soldier, but I guess that works too, for victims of warfare and violence belong to a timeline that knows no end. As Dolores sings:

It’s the same old theme/Since nineteen-sixteen

I can recall many nights in my local pub in the nineties when this heavier Cranberries song was coming out from the jukebox. Some of them at the cost of my loose change.

R.I.P Dolores. Thanks for the music. Hope you’ve found peace.